Another Day

Yesterday, I took my usual route into work with my guide dog, Trigger. The route to my local station entails passing the Queens Hotel, on Church Road in London SE19. On reaching the hotel, Trigger stopped dead in his tracks due to a large crowd of tourists blocking the pavement. The word ”Achtung!” (meaning attention or take care) rang out and a section of the crowd moved to allow Trigger and I through. I did, however have to say “excuse me” several times as others in the crowd had apparently, not heard their tour guide’s  “Achtung!”.

 

On such occasions I try not to let my frustration show, as I know that we British block walkways when abroad and while meandering our way around this sceptered isle. Nonetheless its frustrating when people block pavements, particularly when they can see a visually impaired person approaching with a guide dog or white cane.

 

My irritation soon subsided when I remembered that the French author, Emile Zola had stayed at the Queens Hotel during its glory days, https://insidecroydon.com/2015/01/08/zolas-exile-in-upper-norwood-and-case-for-two-blue-plaques/

Zola bravely wrote an articl accusing the French authorities of antisemitism for imprisoning a French officer, Dreyfus, (who was of Jewish descent) for providing secret information to Germany. Dreyfus was, in point of fact innocent and was later pardoned by the authorities. However Zola’s criticism lead to the imposition of a fine and a prison sentence. Rather than submit to French “justice” Zola fled to Upper Norwood. (Anyone interested in the “Dreyfus Affair” can read about it here, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreyfus_affair).

 

On reaching my local station, I took the train into London Victoria. On arrival in Victoria I was faced by a number of busy roads and was grateful to a lady who helped me to cross 2 of the busiest ones. We chatted briefly and I learned that her name was Marianne, which made me think of Leonard Cohen’s song “So Long Marianne” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZI6EdnvH-8, but, not knowing my helper well I decided not to mention either Cohen or his song!

 

As I walked along Victoria Street, Trigger suddenly made a dive for the food being eaten by a person who was (I assume) homeless, as they where crouched down by one of the pillars which support the canopy that overhangs a number of the shops. All I could do was apologise! I did, of course feel incredibly guilty as I continued on my way. Trigger should not have taken the food. However whatever was being eaten was at his level and its extremely tempting for any dog (even a guide dog) to help himself in such situations. Also, to be fair to Trigger, given that the food was at his level he may have thought that it was being offered to him.

 

So, all in all an eventful trip into central London!

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Heather and Rose

I know a young lady called Heather

Who likes to dress in leather.

Her good friend Rose

Does poetry compose

About girls who dress in leather …

 

There was a young lady called Heather

Who wore one single feather.

My good friend Rose

Goes without clothes

In every kind of weather …

 

 

“The Poetry of Ernest Dowson” – A Guest Post by K Morris @ New Author Online | LibroLiv

My thanks to Olivia, for allowing me to post on her blog about one of my favourite poets, ernest Christopher Dowson. Kevin

LibroLiv

Today I have something a little different to share with you all: a guest post! This guest post is written by the amazing K Morris from the blog New Author Online, a poet I have spoken a lot about on this blog and praised highly in my reviews of his poetry anthologies. In his article, he discusses his love for the poet Ernest Dowson.

I really enjoyed reading it, and I hope you do, too!

Olivia (:

true blood cheers GIF

View original post 778 more words

“The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” (forthcoming audio edition)

I am in the process of arranging for my latest collection of poems, “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” to be recorded and made available as an audio download. (“The Writer’s Pen” is currently available, as an e-book in the Kindle store and can be found here, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07GD1LBMV/).

I hope that my collection will be available, to purchase from audible.co.uk and audible.com by Christmas 2018.

My previous collection, “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” is available, as an audio download from audible.co.uk and audible.com, and can be found here, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077VZTM3V/.

Currently I am in the process of deciding whether to record “The Writer’s Pen” myself or whether to assign that task to a professional actor or actress.

Once “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” is available in audio format I shall, of course post a link here.

Kevin

Sunday Evening Humour

There is a young lady called Irene
Who I have never seen.
She has a son named Mike
Who looks very like
Me, and that young lady I’ve never seen …

I know a young lady named Moore
Who all the men adore.
She works in a club
Called the Back Rub
And the police they bang on the door …

The Great Panjandrum Himself: Nonsense Literature Before Carroll and Lear

I am a big fan of humorous verse, particularly the limerick so was interested to read this post on Interesting Literature.

Interesting Literature

In this week’s Dispatches from The Secret Library, Dr Oliver Tearle explores the eighteenth-century origins of nonsense literature

When did the tradition of English nonsense literature arise? Who invented nonsense literature? Although Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear are the names that immediately spring to mind, several eighteenth-century writers should get a mention in the history of nonsense writing. One is Henry Carey, who among other things coined the phrase ‘namby-pamby’ in his lambasting of the infantile verses of his contemporary, Ambrose Philips; another is the playwright Samuel Foote, known as the ‘English Aristophanes’, who lost one of his legs in an accident but took it good-humouredly, and often made jokes about it.

View original post 687 more words