Wavertree Playground or The Mystery

As a child growing up in Liverpool, I have happy memories of visiting “The Mystery” or, to give the park it’s correct name, “Wavertree Playground”.
The unofficial title of “The Mystery” derives from the fact that the donor of the land wished to remain unknown. It is, however believed that the land was gifted by a Mr Holt of Liverpool, (http://www.old-merseytimes.co.uk/wavertreeplayground.html).

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “Wavertree Playground or The Mystery

  1. mylifeliverpool

    My memories of Liverpool with my family from 1973 until 2015. That’s 42 years of life experience in Liverpool. We lived in Croxteth, Huyton, Tuebrook, Broadgreen and Dovecot. Originally born in London we moved to Cyprus in 1970 returning to the UK (Liverpool) in 1973 just before the Turkish invaded Cyprus. We lost our home and came back to the UK to settle in Croxteth. Our house was smashed up several times, car destroyed by fire and my oldest brother beaten and put in hospital. I attended West Derby School on Mill Lane where I was subjected to the worse racial torture you can imagine- at one stage I was abducted at just twelve years of age outside Tuebrook Police station while walking to Newsham Park to meet my friend- the abductors being two pupils from West Derby School whom I knew. They were taking me to the old desolate railway lines to inflict a beating on me. Luckily I was rescued by a man who saw that I was very distressed. Another time I was pushed through a plate glass classroom window by a group of racist thugs and then when I told the teacher I was told that it was normal for kids to behave that way and my parents were called to the school and told they had to pay for the window. We moved five times but each time the racism would follow us. My sister at just two years of age had a brick thrown at her, slicing past her face and hitting the wall. My mother and father just a few years ago were attacked in their own home by two thugs- my father had CS gas sprayed in his eyes and my mother punched down the stairs, soon after to suffer cancer (both in their 80s). I was lucky as I got out of Liverpool after forty years of hell but the mental scars remain and now I write about “The Capital of Racism” as I believe many people are still suffering today. The torture we suffered as a family tore us apart, my three brothers developed serious mental illnesses and one of them has now fled the country. My last day in Liverpool in 2015 was a memorable one- I was set upon by two men in Page Moss while visiting the shops. I reported it to the police hate crime unit who after investigating told me that they could not proceed with the investigation through lack of evidence. I investigated myself and found that there was CCTV that recorded 24/7. This is the issue in Liverpool and has been for forty two years- racism is rife, it is built into the Liverpool genetics and passed down through generations, the police and authorities are not interested and never have been so it continues. My parents are European, I and my brothers were born in London. Liverpool people see black and white. If you are slightly darker than white then you are labelled a pa.i and your life will be made hell. After 42 years I am now living in Cheshire and the people are amazing. I can walk to the shops without having to carry a weapon to defend myself and the only time I need a police officer is when I’m lost- I feel so sorry for the “darker looking” people in Liverpool who maybe for financial reasons cannot get out of that hell hole. I say darker looking because that’s what the racists in Liverpool look for prior to launching their hate campaign of violence- out of 52 years I spent just 3- years out of the UK. My parents being European are slightly darker so we as children inherited that dark skin and that’s all it takes to have your life destroyed in Liverpool. Hopefully, once published, my book will raise awareness of the racism problem in Liverpool. I will be sending a free copy to the Liverpool Schools I attended in the hope they can educate their teachers in the damage racism does to children and how that damage shapes their adult life. People sometimes say “move on” but the truth is when your childhood is poisoned by the violence of racism and your family is ripped apart then moving on is never possible. I have placed a few videos on my page and more personal ones will follow although they are graphic and portray true racism in Liverpool in it’s worse violent form.

    Reply
    1. drewdog2060drewdog2060 Post author

      Thank you for your comment. I am sorry that your experience of Liverpool was not a happy one and I would be interested in reading your book once it is published.
      Thank you for your comment. I am sorry that your experience of Liverpool was not a happy one and I would be interested in reading your book once it is published.
      Due to being visually impaired (I am registered blind but possess some useful residual vision) I was, on occasions called names due to my disability, as a child growing up in Liverpool. I have, however found (and continue to find) most inhabitants of Liverpool warm and friendly.
      The experience of you and your family is indefensible, but does not constitute the experience of all people of darker complexion growing up in the city.
      I am glad that you are now happy living in Cheshire. I have family in Liverpool and visit the city often. However I now live in London (Upper Norwood/Crystal Palace) which is racially diverse and most people get along well together (which is as it should be). Kevin

      Reply
      1. mylifeliverpool

        Hi and thanks for your comment. I agree that most darker people growing up in the city may not suffer the violence we did and that not all Liverpool people are racist as I had some good friends and met some lovely people over the 42 years I spent their. I think the issue sits around the gang areas, that is areas populated by anti social behaviour problems such as the inner back streets of Croxteth, Dovecot, page moss etc. If you check over my page you will see that some despicable racist crimes are being committed there today. I think the police put more resources into the city itself because they don’t want tourism smeared. I attended west derby comprehensive on mill lane and suffered the worse racism you can imagine in full view of the teachers and I went on to work in Liverpool, again suffering racial hatred from the staff in forms that would shock you- constantly targeted and given racist names by the staff. This abuse continued until I left Liverpool in 2015. I now live in Cheshire and the people are amazing. I feel free and no longer have to carry a weapon. Cannot explain how that feels. My brothers weren’t so lucky. One of them retaliated against the racists and he and his wife and child were evicted. My other two brothers became seriously mentally ill. It tore our family apart. We were once the closest family you could imagine.

      2. mylifeliverpool

        A friend of ours, Paul Walters like myself was born in London. He visited Liverpool in 2015 from London. On the bus travelling through TUEBROOK he went to the defence of two Asian kids who were being racially abused by one of the many Liverpool racist pensioners. Here is the video which shows that racism is in the genes of the parents and passed down to the children- this was witnessed by young kids on the bus who now think treating fellow human beings like this is normal. Needless to say, Paul’s visit to Liverpool was not a happy one. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Hmw66AkN2-g

      3. drewdog2060drewdog2060 Post author

        The video is unedifying (to put it mildly) and racial abuse (or any abuse) is wrong. This video is, however not unique in that such incidents are far from being confined to Liverpool. I have heard racially offensive language used in both Liverpool and London and anyone who studies the far-right will find they exist throughout the United Kingdom. The National Front was, for example long headquartered in the London borough of Croydon (although it’s HQ is now elsewhere, but not Liverpool). I remember as a teenager visiting Leeds and finding stickers promoting the neo-Nazi White Defence League (WDL) on a bus stop on a rundown council estate. I am truly sorry that you have had the experiences you describe, but such experiences are not unique to Liverpool and a Googling of news stories about racial incidents will show them occuring throughout the UK. Virus-free. http://www.avast.com

      4. mylifeliverpool

        Very true although I lived London for nine years with my family and attended Furzedown School and we were never subjected to a single piece of racism. The fact that we lived in five areas of Liverpool and was subjected to daily violent racism in all five areas is something to take into account when deciding the extremity of racism in the UK. I think you have to be dark skinned and live in Liverpool to experience it. I spent fifteen years installing cctv in Liverpool as that was my business and as such have witnessed first hand the level of racist violence with fourteen cases of racism reported to SIGMA in Dovecot in just two months. My own parents being one of those cases. Our home was attacked at least three times a week. We never had that in London. My father lived with my mother in Croydon from 1935 until 1970 without a single incident of race hate- he worked in Barts Hospital. That’s 35 years of peace compared to 42 years of constant war in Liverpool. My experiences speak for themselves. My brother lived with his wife in Broad Green, Liverpool up until 2015 and after his autistic child who went to STOCKBRIDGE school was beaten to a pulp he decided to retaliate- the result being he was evicted by the council. We have over one hundred documented events in Liverpool yet not a single event in London.

  2. mylifeliverpool

    I live in Cheshire now with my family and have done since 2015. Not one single incident of race hate! I can walk to the shops without carrying a weapon. The neighbours all came over to welcome us the day with moved in. We cannot get our kids out of our neighbours homes as their kids are knocking our door constantly for them to play out- we have a new safe life. I can only speak from our own experience as a family not of statistics but of real life. Liverpool is dead to me and our family- when we have to drive south we drive around it, avoiding every road as just the sight of a sign with Liverpool on upsets us. We visit London all the time- we were down in Edgware just recently.

    Reply
    1. drewdog2060drewdog2060 Post author

      As I said previously, I’m saddened to read of your experience. I am white British so do not know what it is like to experience racism due to the colour of my skin. In the mid 1990’s I dated a lady who was black British. We spent several days in Liverpool and during that time my then partner experienced no racism. During our time together we also visited Cornwall and Devon where (as you are probably aware) ethnic minorities form a very small segment of the population. While in both places we did get stared at. However there where no comments of a racist nature and the staring may have stemmed, in part at least of the unusual sight of a blind white man (with a guide dog), accompanied by an attractive black lady. I was, incidentally also stared at during my visit to China which flowed from the rarity of westerners in that particular city. Virus-free. http://www.avast.com

      Reply
      1. mylifeliverpool

        That’s interesting. I have been fortunate enough to have lived in Italy, Cyprus, London, Liverpool and France and I have travelled on business to Beijing, Canada, the US and Taiwan on business trips so my book will be based on my families experiences based around torture, abduction and the most severe violence. Unfortunately no other place other than Liverpool can dominate a section of the book as nothing negative worth commenting about occurred there with regards to racism other than the odd glance or stare which in my opinion was never an issue for me or my family. My book should go to print in March 2018 with 150000 copies. I will let you know when it goes to print 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s