Category Archives: sharing your work

“My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” is now available, as an audio download, from Audible

I am pleased to announce that my collection of poetry, “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” is now available, as an audio download from audible.co.uk and audible.com.

“My Old Clock I Wind” derives its title from the clock which sits, in pride of place, on the bookcase in my living room. The title poem reads as follows:

“My old clock I wind
And much philosophy therein find.
I can bring
The pendulum’s swing
To a stop with my hand;
Yet I can not command
Time to default
On his duty and halt
The passing of the years.
He has no ears
For our laughter and tears
And his sickle will swing on
Long after we are gone”.

About The Author

I was born in Liverpool in 1969, a year best known of course for my birth. Well no, actually it is better known for the moon landings which certain peculiar conspiracy theorists still maintain never took place (the moon landings that is, not my birth!).

It was from my grandfather that I derived my first love of literature and I have many happy memories of him reading to me. As I grew older I learned to read Braille which opened up the world of independent reading and I still remember how amazing it was to me, as a young boy, to be able to sit with a book on my knee reading for myself.

I attended school in Liverpool and later went on to read history and politics at university. Having obtained my BA, I went on to gain an MA in political theory.

Since 1994 I have lived and worked in London. I find that I cannot write with background noise, other than the singing of birds, and am lucky that my home overlooks a large garden and an historic park in Crystal Palace, famed for it’s steep hills and fresh air.

Where to buy “My Old Clock I Wind”

Audible (UK) – https://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Arts-Entertainment/My-Old-Clock-I-Wind-and-Other-Poems-Audiobook/B077VYT3X6/ref=a_search_c4_1_1_srTtl?qid=1512505394&sr=1-1
Audible.com – https://www.audible.com/pd/Drama-Poetry/My-Old-Clock-I-Wind-and-Other-Poems-Audiobook/B077VS5CTN/ref=a_search_c4_1_1_srTtl?qid=1512505653&sr=1-1
Amazon (US) – https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0735JBVBG
Amazon (UK) – https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0735JBVBG
Moyhill Publishing – http://moyhill.com/clock/
The royal National Institute of Blind People (braille edition)http://shop.rnib.org.uk/ or call 0303 123 9999, quoting order number 25870603.

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Kick Off Your Shoes

Kick off your shoes
For a stranger is a friend not yet made.
Be not staid
Dear maid
But lose
Yourself in booze
And forget
Regret.

Let us draw the curtain
For tomorrow
Is uncertain
Your skin is silky smooth
But how the clock’s hands move
Towards the morrow,
Which the forecasters say
Will be a dismal day.

Why I am reluctant to comment on the work of fellow poets

It goes without saying that I am delighted whenever readers express appreciation for my work. Its wonderful to know that my poetry brings pleasure to others.

On occasions readers appreciation of my poetry has caused them to contact me requesting that I critique their work. I am greatly flattered when this occurs. However I invariably respond with a courteous decline.

As with all poets, I have my own unique style. This usually entails the extensive use of rhyme. I find an intrinsic beauty in traditional rhyming poetry which, no doubt is a major factor in explaining my use of the form. That is not to say that I never engage in free verse poetry. I do, however this is rare and when I do utilise this form it is, almost invariably in the context of a poem in which rhyme predominates. Where I to critique many free verse poems I would, in all honesty have to say that I did not consider them to constitute poetry. That is not to say that free verse can not be moving and extremely beautiful. Indeed it can and it is worthy of praise as regards the possession of these qualities. It is, however (in my opinion) moving and beautiful prose (rather than poetry) and any comments by me would, in all honesty have to reflect my view of the matter.

More generally, my perspective of the merits and/or demerits of a given poem is just that (my own view), others may disagree. I do not wish to be the person responsible for dampening the enthusiasm of a budding poet. I do, from time to time come across poetry which is (in my opinion) truly awful. When confronted by work of this nature I click away without commenting because (as I say above) I have no desire to puncture anyone’s balloon.

My own style of writing (rhyming poetry) is, I am well aware considered as old-fashioned and overly restrictive by many modern poets and critics. One mans meat is another mans poison. Let each poet plough his/her own furrow, I will not trespass on their territory (other than to comment and/or like if I truly feel that their work possesses merit). Otherwise I shall refrain from passing judgement.

National Poetry Day celebrates local poets

To celebrate National Poetry Day, (which took place on 28 September), BBC local radio commissioned 12 poets from across England to write a poem incorporating a local word. To be frank some of these poems left me cold. I was, however rather taken with “Twittens”. To read the 12 poems please visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4jjwQBspBn4NLRyB53d0dnJ/national-poetry-day-free-the-word.

Lost Shoe

Who
Left
Her shoe?
What should I do?
For a foot bereft
Of shoe
Is a sorrowful sight to view.
I grieve
As I perceive
That she lost her stocking
Too.
Tis a thing most shocking
To lose both stocking
And shoe …

National Poetry Day (Thursday 28th September)

Thursday 28th September is National Poetry Day here in the United Kingdom. To find out about National Poetry Day, including the events taking place, please visit https://nationalpoetryday.co.uk/.

There was a man who suffered from introspection

There was a man who suffered from introspection,
Which frequently led to dejection.
A surrealist, called Mark
Said “your future is dark,
As you are a mere computer projection”!