Category Archives: sharing your work

There was a man who suffered from introspection

There was a man who suffered from introspection,
Which frequently led to dejection.
A surrealist, called Mark
Said “your future is dark,
As you are a mere computer projection”!

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Getting your self-published books into libraries

A useful article on how to get self-published books into libraries.

I know from my own experience, that approaching libraries directly is a productive means of getting your work onto their shelves.

I was delighted when Liverpool Central Library, wrote to confirm that they had added 2 copies of my collection of poetry, “My Old Clock I Wind”, (http://moyhill.com/clock/), to their shelves.

As a result of me contacting Swansea University (my former place of study), they kindly accepted my donation of one copy of “My Old Clock”.

Consequently, from my own experience I can say that getting your self-published books into libraries is perfectly possible.

There Was A Young Poet Called Kevin

There was a young poet called Kevin
Who said “I may not get to heaven.
But I shall write
Throughout the night,
And get drunk by half-past seven”!

“My Old Clock I Wind” will soon be available as an audio download

Following on from my post of 8 August, in which I said that I was exploring the possibility of having “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” recorded, using Audiobook Creation Exchange, I am pleased to announce that my work is now in the process of being recorded. I will, of course post here once the audio version of “My Old Clock” is available.

In the meantime, anyone who is interested in reading “My Old Clock” can find it in paperback and ebook formats on the publisher’s website http://moyhill.com/clock/

The book is also available in braille, for sale or loan from the Royal National Institute of Blind People

The Poetry Library

If you have published a collection of poetry, the Poetry Library (based at London’s Southbank Centre) will consider stocking your work (including books from small presses and self-published titles).

The Poetry Library’s website states:

• The library contains 200,000 items and is growing all the time
• We acquire two copies of each book and audio title, one for reference and one for loan
• We aim to stock all poetry titles published in the UK with a representation of work from other countries including work in parallel text and English translation
• An exhibition space featuring works by artists engaging with the Library’s collection, text and poetry in general, and projects and events at Southbank Centre
• The librarians meet once a month to consider self-published and small press items for the collection and will always respond to those who submitted something for consideration”.

To find out more about the Poetry Library or to contact them please visit, http://www.poetrylibrary.org.uk/about/.

You Like My Poems? So Pay For Them

An interesting article by poet Wendy Cope entitled “You like my poems? So pay for them”, https://www.theguardian.com/books/2007/dec/08/featuresreviews.guardianreview14. In her article, Cope bemoans the tendency of people to copy and circulate poems that are in copyright without obtaining the permission of the poet in question.
Cope’s piece reminds me of an incident involving an acquaintance. The gentleman in question told me how much he had enjoyed reading one of my poems (on my website) and how it was now on his phone so he could refer to it more easily. On the one hand, I was flattered to hear that my work had brought so much pleasure to someone who I liked and respected. However, on the other I wished that my acquaintance had asked my permission or maybe even bought one of my books! Rather than embarking on a potentially embarrassing exchange, I smiled and said how delighted I was that my poem gave him so much pleasure.
Of course many of my poems are available online (on this website) and I have no issue with people using the reblog facility to share portions of them with their followers. Likewise I’m delighted when people share links to my work on Twitter and other social media. There is, however a difference between such sharing and copying whole poems without the poet’s permission. Many people copying and/or reproducing poems without permission mean no harm. It is none the less wrong for them to do so without the express permission of their creator.

Now you see it, now you don’t

The internet is a place of impermanence. Now you see content, now you don’t.
In 2016 I was privileged to be interviewed by Tom Cannon of Croydon Radio, regarding my collection of poetry “Lost in the Labyrinth of My Mind”. A podcast of my interview subsequently appeared on Croydon Radio’s website and I linked to it as a permanent record of the event. Sadly anyone who visits Croydon Radio’s website today will receive the following message
“Croydon Radio has now closed. Thanks for listening.

Fortunately my interview still exists and can be found on my publisher’s website, http://moyhill.com/lost/assets/km-interview-croydon-radio-2016-04-09-16-00-53-edited-64k.mp3. However there will, I am sure be many others who did not obtain edited copies of their podcasts, who’s broadcasts are forever lost.
Authors and other creatives put considerable time and effort into obtaining radio interviews and it is a feather in one’s cap when a broadcaster agrees to interview you. However, as demonstrated above nothing is forever. Consequently (if you possibly can) its well worth obtaining your own copy of that interview of which you are so proud as it may not be where you think it should be (on the broadcaster’s website).