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My Review of “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” by Heather Morris

Linda's Book Obsession:

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My Review of “The Tattooist of Auschwitz ”  by Heather Morris

Kudos to Heather Morris, Author of “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” for combining the Historical Fiction and Fiction genres. From the Goodreads Blurb”, “The “Tattooist of Auschwitz” is based on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov two Slovakian Jews who survived Auschwitz and eventually made their home in Australia.”

In this novel, Heather Morris portrays Lale as a charming, and enterprising individual. To save his family, Lale volunteers to leave with the German Gestapo, believing that his family will be safe. Of course, Lale realizes when he is in a crowded  Cattle Car, he suspects that this is the beginning of a devastating time. Lale does reach out and helps calm some other men. In Auschwitz, Lale somehow finds himself becoming The Tattooist,  having to tattoo the numbers on his fellow prisoners. There he meets Gita, a young…

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‘I was much further out than you thought’

I first came across Stevie Smith’s “Not Waving But Drowning” in “The New Oxford Book of English Verse”, chosen and edited by Helen Gardner. This post certainly does the poem justice.

Charlotte Gann

IMG_20180105_125224092_HDRThe poem ‘Not Waving but Drowning’ by Stevie Smith is only twelve lines long. Yet, the first time I read it, it created in my mind, for evermore, a whole world – and life story. Not thepoet’s – or certainly not directly; no, ‘the dead one’’s:

Nobody heard him, the dead man,
But still he lay moaning:
I was much further out than you thought
And not waving but drowning.

The poem paints a vivid scene. We see a man waving; drowning; overhear words spoken perhaps in a crowd – at least, I picture a small knot of people gathering on the shore; maybe, someone quoted in the local news – a witness. (And Stevie Smith did get her original inspiration from a newspaper story, she said.) But these aren’t just casual bystanders; they also know or knew the man, at least in passing. Maybe they’re neighbours, or…

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Welcome to my Blog!

A platform for young writers to express themselves.

Young Writers and Poets

Dear young writers and poets,

Welcome to my blog!

I have created this blog so as to give you the opportunity to express your creativity and artistic talents.

It is meant to be a platform where like-minded persons can share their passion and voice their ideas, thoughts and feelings.

It is a place where they can share their writing- whether it is poetry or prose and comment on each other’s posts so as to hone the writer in them.

Members of this blog have been carefully chosen.

They are those who are both intelligent and creative and who are most of all lovers of literature.

creativityThey are those who have a passion and enthusiasm for reading and writing.

downloadThey are those who have a great understanding of the world around them and a greater insight into human nature.

1812862-John-Keats-Quote-Scenery-is-fine-but-human-nature-is-finerThese persons are YOU! YOU have the ability of creating a new…

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10 Classic Wilfred Owen Poems Everyone Should Read

Interesting Literature

The best poems of Wilfred Owen

Previously, we’ve selected ten of the best poems about the First World War; but of all the English poets to write about that conflict, one name towers above the rest: Wilfred Owen (1893-1918). Here’s our pick of Wilfred Owen’s ten best poems.

Futility’. This is a brief lyric that focuses on a group of soldiers standing over the dead body of a fallen comrade, and is one of Owen’s finest uses of his trademark pararhyme (or half-rhyme). Although the speaker and his fellow soldiers seem to think that the ‘kind old sun’ will be able to revive their dead comrade, we readers know that this is hopeful optimism if not naivety on the part of the speaker.

Strange Meeting’. Siegfried Sassoon called ‘Strange Meeting’ Owen’s passport to immortality; it’s certainly true that it’s poems like this that helped to…

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Introducing – Poet Kevin Morris

A big thank you to Lucy Brazier for publishing my guest post. If you haven’t checked out Lucy’s blog (and her books), you are in for a treat when you do so. Kevin

Secret Diary Of PorterGirl

Secret Diary of PorterGirl is delighted to welcome poet Kevin Morris, who would like to tell you a little about himself and his work. His latest highly acclaimed anthology has just been released in audio format.

mociw-for-acx-cover-2-smallI have long been a fan of Lucy’s writings, avidly following the adventures of Portergirl and Lucy’s wonderful Poirot parodies! I was therefore honoured to be invited to contribute a guest post to Lucy’s blog. Thank you Lucy!

I was born in Liverpool (UK) on 6 January 1969. The year in question is, of course best known (and celebrated) for my birth, although a few individuals do contend (wholly erroneously I may say) that 1969 is better known for the moon landings!

I lost the majority of my eyesight at 18-months-old due to a blood clot.

I am a braille user and have happy memories of leafing through “The Oxford Book of English Verse” and…

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An Interview with a Poet: Peter Sansom| LibroLiv

A fascinating interview with poet Peter Sansom, including some useful advice for aspiring poets.

LibroLiv

Way back in April 2017 I got the opportunity to interview an amazing poet, Peter Sansom. If you haven’t read his poetry, I definitely recommend it! I wrote this post for Hive South Yorkshire, but thought I would also post it here for you guys to read. To see the original post, click here. Hope you enjoy! Olivia x

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