Tag Archives: culture

Great Minds Think Different – Celebrating Neurodiverse Creativity

A friend has drawn the below event to my attention:

“Great Minds Think Different – Celebrating neurodiverse creativity

Come along to an evening of poetry, live music and art celebrating neurodiversity!
Exceptional Individuals in association with Crouch End Arts Festival are hosting an evening of entertainment at the Tap Room at the Harringay Arms on Saturday 16th June, 7 – 9pm.

It will feature performances and exhibits from neurodiverse poets, singers and artists.

Drinks available to buy at the bar.

Exceptional Individuals is an organisation that supports people with dyslexia, dyspraxia, autism, ADHD and other forms of neurodiversity into employment, and helps them to thrive. (https://www.exceptionalindividuals.com/”).

For the event’s webpage please visit https://www.crouchendfestival.org/events/great-minds-think-different-celebrating-neurodiverse-creativity/

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I Am No Poet

I am no poet, for when,
At 10 AM
Men
Of letters drink beer
You will see
A sight most queer,
Namely me
Drinking tea
Or coffee,
So how can I a poet be?!

At 3 AM
When
Men
Of poetry are kept awake
By young ladies of ill repute,
There can be
No dispute
That you will find me
(Unbound)
Locked In the arms of sleep
Profound,
‘Tis enough to make me weep!

So while others get drunk
As the proverbial scunk
I shall sip my coffee
Or tea
And studiously avoid poetry …

In The Desert Of The Heart

In the desert of the heart
Any touch may start
A flame

Any hand
May command
A hot
Flush
(Wanted or not),
But who are we to rush
To blame?

Is this thing called shame
A social construct that keeps us low?
Many prefer not to go
Down that path
Of enquiry. They laugh,
Make a smutty joke
And on their own hypocrisy choke.

Why You Should Read and Write Poetry

A good article on The Imaginative Conservative, entitled “Why You Should Read and Write Poetry”, http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2018/01/read-write-poetry-dwight-longenecker.html

Why I am reluctant to comment on the work of fellow poets

It goes without saying that I am delighted whenever readers express appreciation for my work. Its wonderful to know that my poetry brings pleasure to others.

On occasions readers appreciation of my poetry has caused them to contact me requesting that I critique their work. I am greatly flattered when this occurs. However I invariably respond with a courteous decline.

As with all poets, I have my own unique style. This usually entails the extensive use of rhyme. I find an intrinsic beauty in traditional rhyming poetry which, no doubt is a major factor in explaining my use of the form. That is not to say that I never engage in free verse poetry. I do, however this is rare and when I do utilise this form it is, almost invariably in the context of a poem in which rhyme predominates. Where I to critique many free verse poems I would, in all honesty have to say that I did not consider them to constitute poetry. That is not to say that free verse can not be moving and extremely beautiful. Indeed it can and it is worthy of praise as regards the possession of these qualities. It is, however (in my opinion) moving and beautiful prose (rather than poetry) and any comments by me would, in all honesty have to reflect my view of the matter.

More generally, my perspective of the merits and/or demerits of a given poem is just that (my own view), others may disagree. I do not wish to be the person responsible for dampening the enthusiasm of a budding poet. I do, from time to time come across poetry which is (in my opinion) truly awful. When confronted by work of this nature I click away without commenting because (as I say above) I have no desire to puncture anyone’s balloon.

My own style of writing (rhyming poetry) is, I am well aware considered as old-fashioned and overly restrictive by many modern poets and critics. One mans meat is another mans poison. Let each poet plough his/her own furrow, I will not trespass on their territory (other than to comment and/or like if I truly feel that their work possesses merit). Otherwise I shall refrain from passing judgement.

British schoolgirl is first non-Japanese winner of Haiku competition

A British schoolgirl is the first non-Japanesewinner of a Japanese haiku competition. Gracie Starkey, who was 13 at the time when she composed the poem, visited Japan to receive the prestigious prize.

To read this beautiful haiku, and more about Gracie, please visit HERE,