Tag Archives: My old clock I wind and other poems

Author News for Poet Kevin Morris

I was delighted to receive the braille edition of my collection of poems, “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” through the post today.

I had emailed The Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) on 8 August with a request that my book be transcribed into braille. On the same date I received an acknowledgement of my request and today (as already mentioned) my pamphlet was delivered. Hats off to RNIB for their excellent work!

My previous collection, “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” is also available, in braille from the RNIB, https://newauthoronline.com/2017/08/09/my-old-clock-i-wind-and-other-poems-is-available-in-braille-from-rnib/.

The ebook and print versions of “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems” will be available in September, so the braille edition is the first on the block!

RNIB have provided me with my own personal copy of “The Writer’s Pen” (it is not currently available for loan or sale from them). I will, however contact RNIB with a request that they add my latest collection to their stock in order that it is available to other braille users.

As many of you will know, I was honoured to be interviewed by Ariadne Sawyer, of The World Poetry Reading Series, on Thursday 9 August, https://newauthoronline.com/2018/08/05/kevins-poetry-to-be-featured-on-the-world-poetry-reading-series-at-110-pm-on-thursday-9-august/, regarding “The Writer’s Pen and Other Poems”.

I am pleased to report that the interview went well (my phone behaved itself and I dialled in 10 minutes prior to the start of the interview)!

I shall post a link to the podcast of my interview once this becomes available.

You can listen to my previous interview on The World Poetry Reading Series by following this link, http://moyhill.com/clock/assets/km_interview2-world_poetry_cafe-2017.04.05.mp3.

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Forthcoming Poetry Pamphlet

For some time now, I have been working on a new collection of poems which will, I hope be published in September. The pamphlet, which contains a total of 44 poems, is entitled “The Writer’s Pen and Other poems”. Below is one of the poems which will be included:

“My hair is barely wet
At all
And yet
The rain did fall
As I stood
In yonder wood.

The yammer
Of a hammer
Reached my ear,
While the birds free
Sang to me
As I touched the flowers
That know not hours”.

My pamphlet will be available in print initially and (in the longer term) as an ebook from the Amazon Kindle store.

If you would like to register your interest in obtaining a print copy please send an email to me at newauthor online (at) gmail dot com (the address is given thus to avoid spam). The print version will retail at a cost of £4.50 and signed copies can be obtained at no extra charge.

For details of my previous collection, “My Old Clock I Wind” please visit https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0735JBVBG.

The Glorious Inefficiency Of Local Bookstores

“The elegiac atmosphere is part of the appeal. This bookstore, this artifact from a more literate past, serves as a reminder of values that have, in America, faded like pages in a weathered volume. The small, independent bookstore is simply a place out of sync with contemporary culture, chiefly because its very being emphasizes an appreciation of quietude, romance, and the kind of glorious inefficiency upon which the best of human life rests”.
(http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2017/11/local-bookstore-dean-abbott.html).

At the age of 49, (my 50th birthday looms, should that be lurks? Ahead), I can relate to much of the above article. I can recall visiting such places in the company of my late grandfather and browsing. To this day I still relish the scent of bookstores.

Some 15 minutes walking distance from my home, there sits the Bookseller Crow on the Hill, a great independent bookshop, https://booksellercrow.co.uk/. Not only does the Crow stock books, it also carries a range of audio CDs, calendars and postcaards depicting the Crystal Palace and surrounding area.

Independent bookshops are, from the perspective of authors a great place to get one’s books into. Particularly for independent authors, it can be difficult (frequently impossible) to get the big chains to stock one’s work. Consequently I am grateful to The Bookseller Crow for stocking my collection of poems, “My Old Clock I Wind”, http://moyhill.com/clock/. Its good to know that people in the area in which I live can see my books on display in my local, independent bookstore.

Kevin

“My Old Clock I Wind And Other Poems” By K Morris

On Monday 9 July, I ran into an acquaintance. After exchanging the usual pleasantries, he remarked on how much he had enjoyed reading my collection of poems, “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems”. It is a great feeling to receive a compliment, particularly when it is unsolicited. While the gentleman in question has not (to my knowledge) written a review, “My Old Clock” has received several reviews, including the below, from Audrey Driscoll:

“The first poem in this collection of 74 contains the theme that pervades the entire work – the relentless passage of time. Morris’s verses are products of reflection and mature thought, expressing both resignation and a zest for life.

This poet is not fighting advancing age and eventual death, but lives with an intense awareness of the temporary nature of human lives and preoccupations. “Passing By,” for example, sums this up perfectly in only three lines.

The fleetingness of beauty and attraction are pictured in “Chiffon” and “Dark and Light.” As sadness frequently follows delight / Mourn not, for there can be no dark without the light. The poet’s mixed feelings about his relationships with others are exemplified by “Shall I Sit Out This Dance?” whose last five lines are especially poignant. “What Is A Double Bed?” further explores love, joy, and pain.

Humour is not absent from the collection. “Howling At the Moon,” “Count Dracula Went Out To Dine,” and “It’s Raining Out There,” along with a group of limericks, celebrate the absurdities and quirky angles of life.

A certain amount of social commentary appears in “Crack” and “Girls in Unsuitable Shoes,” which has a touch of wry brilliance.

Climate change is acknowledged by the short poem “Melting Ice.” Of the poems that question progress and technology, perhaps the finest is “Man’s Destiny,” which contrasts the poet’s enjoyment of life’s small pleasures with grandiose aspirations and predictions.

Most of the poems feature pairs of rhyming lines – not rhyming couplets, exactly, because the lines often differ in length and metre. The effect is one of ticking, bringing to mind the clock of the title. In densely packed sequences of short lines, this rhyme pattern can become a bit tedious. “Understanding,” which features a more complex rhyme scheme, is a notable departure. Morris’s poems are distillations of thoughtful life experience, and thus best savoured slowly, like good wine.

Readers will find something here to match any mood, to celebrate life or commiserate with sorrow”.
(For the above review please visit, https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer-reviews/R1S1VEBI73BGP1/ref=cm_cr_dp_d_rvw_ttl?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B0735JBVBG.

You can find “My Old Clock I Wind” in the Amazon Kindle store here, http://amzn.eu/gelHFDE. It is also available from Moyhill Publishing and can be found here, http://moyhill.com/clock/).

A Man Resigns

Dr Philip Lee, the Justice Minister in Britain’s Conservative government, resigned yesterday over the government’s handling of the Brexit issue. Dr Lee said:

“Dr Lee added: ‘Sometimes when a majority of people want something that is against the good of society, government and parliament have a responsibility to protect us.

‘This was the case for the death penalty, where for decades politicians went against the majority view and refused to restore it.
‘Now I believe it has got to be the case for the Brexit process”.’ (See http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5834013/Blow-justice-minister-QUITS-Brexit.html).

It is a brave man who stands up and says that the people are not always right, that government’s should not blindly follow “the will of the people” (my words and not those of Dr Lee) and that politicians should, sometimes protect people from the consequences of their ill judged decisions. I believe that Dr Lee is right and I applaud him for having the courage to resign on a matter of principle.

The issue of whether the UK should leave the European Union is too complicated to be put to the UK electorate, yet this is what was done. The debate surrounding the referendum saw a great deal of what where (quite frankly) lies, for example the claim by leading supporters of the Leave campaign that exiting the EU would mean far more investment in the NHS, and in the sound and fury of this ”tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing” the truth and common sense was lost.

Dr Lee has been criticised for his decision to resign on the grounds that 53 percent of his constituents voted to leave the EU. Yet if a person does, in all conscience believe that his constituents are wrong, is he not correct to go with his own inner conscience rather than with “the will of the majority”? I believe that he is, for the man of conscience can not live with himself if he allow the views of the majority to trump what he, in his heart knows to be right.

“I laud the mass
For to do otherwise is considered crass.
One can not have the brass
Neck to deny
The truth that justice in the majority does lie.

Who am I
To raise
My voice in praise
Of the view
That the few
Sometimes best construe
What is just and true?”
(“My Old Clock I Wind And Other Poems” by K Morris).

Working Towards A Collection Of Poetry

Emma Lee has written a helpful post on producing a collection of poetry. Emma discusses the advantages and disadvantages of publishing a collection dealing with one theme VS producing a book containing a variety of themes.

Emma’s post caused me to ponder on my own writing and, in particular my collection of poetry, “My Old Clock I Wind”. The title of the book brings to mind both clocks and time more generally and there are, indeed a number of poems which deal with this subject matter. There are, however also poems which touch upon a variety of other issues, for example “Crack” which deals with addiction to hard drugs and “Count Dracula Went Out To Dine” (a poem of a more humorous nature). I deliberately chose to include poems on a multiplicity of themes on the basis that “variety is the spice of life”. I enjoy reading collections which cover various subjects and wishing to offer my readers the kind of collection that appeals to me, I took the decision to include a mixture of poems thereby (I hope) enhancing the enjoyment of my readers and avoiding the risk of being pigeonholed as the poet who only writes about time.

You can find Emma Lee’s post here, https://emmalee1.wordpress.com/2018/05/23/working-towards-a-collection-of-poems/.
“My Old Clock I Wind” is available from Moyhill Publishing and can be found here, http://moyhill.com/clock/. It is also available in the Amazon Kindle store, https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0735JBVBG

Has Time Been Called For The Traditional Clock?

I have long been a lover of the traditional and, in particular the chiming clock. My love of clocks can be seen in a number of my poems, including “My Old Clock I Wind”, which can be found in “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems”. One derives a real sense of seconds passing (never to return) when listening to the ponderous tick tock of a traditional pendulum clock such as a Grandfather or Grandmother clock. As I put it in my poem “Time”, “the sickle chops and the heart will, one day, stop”.

Given my love of traditional clocks, I was sad to read an article in The Telegraph in which it is reported that analogue (traditional) clocks are being replaced in school examination halls by digital devices. As one headteacher puts it:

“Malcolm Trobe, deputy general secretary at the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said youngsters have become accustomed to using digital devices.
“The current generation aren’t as good at reading the traditional clock face as older generations,” he told The Telegraph.
“They are used to seeing a digital representation of time on their phone, on their computer. Nearly everything they’ve got is digital so youngsters are just exposed to time being given digitally everywhere.” (See https://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2018/04/24/schools-removing-analogue-clocks-exam-halls-teenagers-unable/).

I remember the excitement, as a schoolboy when a large digital clock was installed in the newly constructed school building which formed a part of the Royal School for the Blind in Liverpool, (one of the schools I attended in that great city). While other children thought the device wonderful, I was left cold and would retreat to the traditional wall mounted (pendulum) clock in another (older) part of the same school.

I can, of course see the advantages of digital devices. But, to me they lack (and always will lack) that elusive thing we call character.

(You can find “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” in the Amazon Kindle Store. “Time” can be found in my collection “Lost In The Labyrinth of My Mind”, which is also available in the Kindle store. Links to all of my books can be found here, https://newauthoronline.com/about/).